Super Reading research

Research Evaluation: Dr Ross Cooper

Before SuperReading, on average, dyslexic students read 19wpm less than non-dyslexic readers, with significantly less comprehension. After SuperReading they read 29wpm more than non-dyslexic readers, with very similar comprehension.

Additionally, before SuperReading, dyslexic readers review 45wpm less than non-dyslexic readers, with significantly less comprehension. After SuperReading they review 198wpm more than non-dyslexic readers, with very similar comprehension.

In effect, after SuperReading, dyslexic readers achieve a very similar comprehension (87% compared to 88%) in 4/5 time of non-dyslexic readers. Whereas, before SuperReading, they took 23% more time to achieve significantly less comprehension (80% compared to 88%).

All the improvements in the results are highly statistically significant.

Reading effectiveness (RE) is measured by combining speed and comprehension into a single score (wpm x % comprehension). We have standardised the reading effectiveness scores of the other 190 people who have undertaken the tests. (This sample is not known to include dyslexic readers, but is known to include a high proportion of teachers). This provides a standardised comparative framework to evaluate the improvements of the dyslexic readers. We have measures of the standardised RE scores for the first reading, as well as the review reading. Finally, because the first reading performance can also effect the review reading performance, we have the standardised RE scores for the combined performance. This combined RE score (CRE) is a measure of the total time taken for the final comprehension, and provides the best overall comparative score.

The mean standardised first reading RE score of the dyslexic group improves from 93 to 106 (from within the lowest 32% to within the highest 34%). The statistical significance is extremely high (p<0.0000001)

The mean review RE standardised scores of the dyslexic group improve from 93 to 123 (from within the lowest 32% to within the highest 6%). The statistical significance is extraordinary (p<1 in 10,000 million).

The mean CRE scores of the dyslexic group improve from 90.8 to 115.2 (from within the lowest 26% to within the highest 16%). This constitutes a rise of 24.4 standardised points ( 1.63 standard deviations). The statistical significance is extraordinary (p< 1 in 10,000 million).

When a group of non-dyslexic volunteers undertook the reading tests over the same time period in very similar conditions as the dyslexic students (but without participating in a SuperReading course) none of the mean reading speeds, comprehension or RE scores improved. This result supports the view that practicing the tests cannot explain any of the improved scores.